©Dorothea Heise















                                                                 Diana Moore, mezzo-soprano



Concert of Bach Cantatas #12, #201
Aston Magna
July 2016


"The unique singing of Dominique Labelle arrests the senses. You must listen to it."

                                                                                                      Keith Kibler, The Berkshire Review for the Arts




Mendelssohn, Lobgesang
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
April 2016


"But the finest contributions came from soprano Dominique Labelle and tenor Thomas Cooley, who each brought extraordinary tonal splendor and dramatic intensity to their assignments. For the soprano duet “I waited for the Lord” — the work’s most heart-stoppingly gorgeous stretch of music — Labelle was joined by Ashley Valentine in a collaboration that was nothing short of seraphic."  

                                                                                                                    Joshua Kosman, San Francisco Gate



"Soprano Dominique Labelle, whose generous, richly colored vocalism made her first solo one of the evening's highlights, returned in several episodes.

                                                                                                                       Georgia Rowe, The Daily Democrat



"Soprano Dominque Labelle joined the excitement part way through, her voice rising in lustrous and urgent descant"
         
                                                                                                          Steven Winn, San Francisco Classical Voice





Wyner
Collage Music Ensemble
January 2016


"The oldest selection was Yehudi Wyner’s song cycle “The Second Madrigal: Voices of Women” (1999). It was written for the nimble-voiced soprano Dominique Labelle, who was front and center for this performance. Soloist, instrumentalists, and conductor sailed through the score on a unified wavelength. Labelle paid especially exquisite attention to the texts, which Wyner selected from the international poetry anthology “A Book of Luminous Things.” "
  
                                                                                                                                Zoe Madonna, Boston Globe



"Composed in 1999 for performance by soprano Labelle, the work is a song cycle on ten poems by and about women that were compiled (and in part translated) by the Polish writer Czes»aw Mi»osz. Although the composer facetiously referred to his “mistake” in writing it for a large ensemble of ten players, the music eminently succeeds in enveloping the singer in sounds “worthy of her talent.” Labelle was seemingly flawless in conveying the rapidly shifting moods of the ten poems." 

                                                                                                   David Schulenberg, Boston Musical Intelligencer





Monteverdi
Aston Magna
June 2015


"Maybe most wonderful of all in this rare weekend was the musical letter, written by Monteverdi, given voice by soprano Dominique Labelle, and subtly accompanied by Catherine Liddell at the lute. Readers will know that Ms. Labelle’s singing is important to me. It is as if she has no technique. That’s right: I said no technique. She doesn’t need a technique, because what she hears she can immediately do. You hear her imagination without filter when she sings. She sat on a small stool, and went through the words, full of passion, sometimes regret, in a way that demanded that I listen; I had no choice. What more can be asked of a singer?"


                                                                                                     Keith Kibler, The Berkshire Review for the Arts



"Labelle returned following intermission with Catherine Liddell (theorbo) for Monteverdi’s Lettera amorosa (Se i languidi i miei sguardi). It is always a sheer delight to hear Dominique Labelle; this duet with Liddell showcased their skills in a divine pairing with nuanced phrasings and articulations and tightly attuned shadings. This performance alone was worth the price of admission and I would love to hear them in this music again."

                                                                                               Cashman Kerr Prince Boston Musical Intelligencer


"“Lettera amorosa” — Labelle accompanied by Liddell’s theorbo — best exemplified Monteverdi’s flair for leveraging musical virtues: As Labelle went from steely vocal brightness to a fine, controlled intimacy, the love letter of the title became a concurrent present-day ritual of vulnerability and poise."

                                                                                                                  Matthew Guerrieri, The Boston Globe


"There were fine moments, supplied mainly by the soprano Dominique Labelle, especially in the impassioned “Lettera Amorosa”. 

                                                                                                               James Oestreich, The New York Times             

           

Handel, Messiah
Calgary Philharmonic
December 2014

"Soprano Dominique Labelle has some of the most beautiful music to sing in this piece, and she was exceptionally fine in her coloratura singing in Rejoice Greatly and moving in I Know that my Redeemer Liveth."

                                                                                                               Kenneth Delong, Calgary Herald




Vivaldi and Zelenka, 
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
December 2014

As soloist, Labelle demonstrated her versatility early in the program with the subtle character changes in the finely drawn meanderings of Prince Paul Esterházy’s Nativity lullaby “Cur fles, Jesu” (Why do you weep, Jesus), and in Franz Joseph Haydn’s “Ave Regina Caelorum” (Hail, Queen of Heaven).

The Haydn cantata contained one of the most memorable and delicately beautiful moments of the concert at the end of Labelle’s cadenza, when McGegan gently picked up the entire ensemble and gave it a little push across the few remaining measures of the composition. Those few seconds alone contained an entire universe of music making.

"As soloist, Labelle demonstrated her versatility early in the program with the subtle character changes in the finely drawn meanderings of Prince Paul Esterházy’s Nativity lullaby “Cur fles, Jesu” (Why do you weep, Jesus), and in Franz Joseph Haydn’s “Ave Regina Caelorum” (Hail, Queen of Heaven).

The Haydn cantata contained one of the most memorable and delicately beautiful moments of the concert at the end of Labelle’s cadenza, when McGegan gently picked up the entire ensemble and gave it a little push across the few remaining measures of the composition. Those few seconds alone contained an entire universe of music making."

                                                                                                               Niels Swinkels, San Francisco Classical Voice

As soloist, Labelle demonstrated her versatility early in the program with the subtle character changes in the finely drawn meanderings of Prince Paul Esterházy’s Nativity lullaby “Cur fles, Jesu” (Why do you weep, Jesus), and in Franz Joseph Haydn’s “Ave Regina Caelorum” (Hail, Queen of Heaven).

The Haydn cantata contained one of the most memorable and delicately beautiful moments of the concert at the end of Labelle’s cadenza, when McGegan gently picked up the entire ensemble and gave it a little push across the few remaining measures of the composition. Those few seconds alone contained an entire universe of music making.
As soloist, Labelle demonstrated her versatility early in the program with the subtle character changes in the finely drawn meanderings of Prince Paul Esterházy’s Nativity lullaby “Cur fles, Jesu” (Why do you weep, Jesus), and in Franz Joseph Haydn’s “Ave Regina Caelorum” (Hail, Queen of Heaven).

The Haydn cantata contained one of the most memorable and delicately beautiful moments of the concert at the end of Labelle’s cadenza, when McGegan gently picked up the entire ensemble and gave it a little push across the few remaining measures of the composition. Those few seconds alone contained an entire universe of music making.
As soloist, Labelle demonstrated her versatility early in the program with the subtle character changes in the finely drawn meanderings of Prince Paul Esterházy’s Nativity lullaby “Cur fles, Jesu” (Why do you weep, Jesus), and in Franz Joseph Haydn’s “Ave Regina Caelorum” (Hail, Queen of Heaven).

The Haydn cantata contained one of the most memorable and delicately beautiful moments of the concert at the end of Labelle’s cadenza, when McGegan gently picked up the entire ensemble and gave it a little push across the few remaining measures of the composition. Those few seconds alone contained an entire universe of music making.

"It began with a brief but grand instrumental sonata by a certain Pavel Josef Vejvanovsky, and a beautiful Nativity lullaby by Prince Paul Esterházy (the grandfather of Haydn’s noble patron), which Labelle delivered with winning grace. She also soared superbly through the billowing passagework of Haydn’s “Ave Regina Coelorum,” with excellent support from the chorus." 

                                                                                              Joshua Kosman, The San Francisco Chronicle





"Moments of Love"

"Dominique Labelle has a beguiling voice; this is the first time I have heard her outside of Baroque repertory, and it is a pleasure indeed. Her concentrated, intense vibrato reminds me of singers of old, and is particularly suited to this “French”—or quasi-French—program. Why quasi? Because Benjamin Britten is hardly a French composer, yet his Cabaret Songs have without a doubt a feeling of the bistro instead of the pub. The real French composers are represented by selections from their finest work—and what a joy to hear the Saint-Saëns Dance macabre in its original form, two years before the tone poem appeared—showing Labelle in top form and capable of some miraculous gradations of nuance, expressivity, and emotion."

                                                                                                               Steven Ritter, Audophile Audio






Handel, Teseo
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
August 2014




The Funniest Classical Music Performances of 2014

"And then there’s the supremely artful silliness of comic opera, which this year provided sidesplittingly funny performances by Dominique Labelle as the catty sorceress in Philharmonia Baroque’s concert performance of Handel’s “Teseo” at Alice Tully Hall" 

                                                                                   Corinna da Fongeca-Wollheim,  The New York Times



"Despite all their best efforts, no one had a chance on that stage opposite Labelle on her best form as one of Handel’s most vivid and dazzling creations. First attracting attention as Donna Anna in Sellars’s “Spanish Harlem” Don Giovanni, she has worked often as a concert singer during her long career. But the soprano affirmed her substantial dramatic chops in a commanding performance of Gluck’s Armide when Opera Lafayette visited the Rose Theatre several years ago."

"However, that evening didn’t prepare me for the tour-de-force she made of Medea; our initial glimpse came in the serene “Dolce riposo” where the restless virago relishes a rare quiet moment reflecting on the fickleness of love. However, after that oasis of calm, Labelle ratcheted herself into a steady fury over Teseo’s rejection—we got denunciations furiously spewed and evil spells cast, all to some of Handel’s most inventive—and challenging–early writing for soprano."
Despite all their best efforts, no one had a chance on that stage opposite Labelle on her best form as one of Handel’s most vivid and dazzling creations. First attracting attention as Donna Anna in Sellars’s “Spanish Harlem” Don Giovanni, she has worked often as a concert singer during her long career. But the soprano affirmed her substantial dramatic chops in a commanding performance of Gluck’s Armide when Opera Lafayette visited the Rose Theatre several years ago.

However, that evening didn’t prepare me for the tour-de-force she made of Medea; our initial glimpse came in the serene “Dolce riposo” where the restless virago relishes a rare quiet moment reflecting on the fickleness of love. However, after that oasis of calm, Labelle ratcheted herself into a steady fury over Teseo’s rejection—we got denunciations furiously spewed and evil spells cast, all to some of Handel’s most inventive—and challenging–early writing for soprano.

However, that evening didn’t prepare me for the tour-de-force she made of Medea; our initial glimpse came in the serene “Dolce riposo” where the restless virago relishes a rare quiet moment reflecting on the fickleness of love. However, after that oasis of calm, Labelle ratcheted herself into a steady fury over Teseo’s rejection—we got denunciations furiously spewed and evil spells cast, all to some of Handel’s most inventive—and challenging–early writing for soprano.

"But her finest moment came in Medea’s immense fifth-act imprecation “Moriró, ma vindicate” where she simply poured out golden tone infused with flashing anger and pain."

                                                                                                                    DeCaffarrelli, Parterre.com

However, that evening didn’t prepare me for the tour-de-force she made of Medea; our initial glimpse came in the serene “Dolce riposo” where the restless virago relishes a rare quiet moment reflecting on the fickleness of love. However, after that oasis of calm, Labelle ratcheted herself into a steady fury over Teseo’s rejection—we got denunciations furiously spewed and evil spells cast, all to some of Handel’s most inventive—and challenging–early writing for soprano.

However, that evening didn’t prepare me for the tour-de-force she made of Medea; our initial glimpse came in the serene “Dolce riposo” where the restless virago relishes a rare quiet moment reflecting on the fickleness of love. However, after that oasis of calm, Labelle ratcheted herself into a steady fury over Teseo’s rejection—we got denunciations furiously spewed and evil spells cast, all to some of Handel’s most inventive—and challenging–early writing for soprano.

However, that evening didn’t prepare me for the tour-de-force she made of Medea; our initial glimpse came in the serene “Dolce riposo” where the restless virago relishes a rare quiet moment reflecting on the fickleness of love. However, after that oasis of calm, Labelle ratcheted herself into a steady fury over Teseo’s rejection—we got denunciations furiously spewed and evil spells cast, all to some of Handel’s most inventive—and challenging–early writing for soprano.

However, that evening didn’t prepare me for the tour-de-force she made of Medea; our initial glimpse came in the serene “Dolce riposo” where the restless virago relishes a rare quiet moment reflecting on the fickleness of love. However, after that oasis of calm, Labelle ratcheted herself into a steady fury over Teseo’s rejection—we got denunciations furiously spewed and evil spells cast, all to some of Handel’s most inventive—and challenging–early writing for soprano.

However, that evening didn’t prepare me for the tour-de-force she made of Medea; our initial glimpse came in the serene “Dolce riposo” where the restless virago relishes a rare quiet moment reflecting on the fickleness of love. However, after that oasis of calm, Labelle ratcheted herself into a steady fury over Teseo’s rejection—we got denunciations furiously spewed and evil spells cast, all to some of Handel’s most inventive—and challenging–early writing for soprano.





"Most memorably, the soprano Dominique Labelle has turned the part of Medea into a sorceress to rival any from the Disney storybooks: temperamental, sharp-witted and motivated by outsize passions. In rage arias like “Sibbillando, ululant,” her voice, deeply hued, heady and potent, resembled a cartoon magic potion."

                                                                              CORINNA da FONSECA-WOLLHEIM, The New York Times




"By contrast, Dominique Labelle was a brilliantly earthy Medea, pivoting abruptly between delicacy and rage. Her range of vocal colors and textures was on full display in her furious Act V pledge of vengeance, “Morirò, ma vindicate.”" 

                                                                                                           David Weininger, The Boston Globe




" Labelle came into her own with the singing of anger and wrath in Act III and after, harnessing her vocal power to deliriously ecstatic effect; “Morirò, mà vindicate” (Act V) was spine-chilling."
  
                                                                                Cashman Kerr Prince, The Boston Musical Intelligencer



"Of course, Dominique Labelle’s irascible sorceress Medea steals the show, whether cackling wickedly like a pantomime witch in her turbulent ‘Sibbillando, ululant’ or the devastating seriousness in her explosive soliloquy ‘Morirò, mà vendicata’."      
                                                                                                              David Vickers, Gramophone, UK.

  




Clérambault, Rameau, Lambert
Four Nations Ensemble



'The evening's real showstoppers were the numbers featuring Labelle.

Labelle sang with an easy command of soprano range and a big, present sound shaded with the sort of dark, rich quality one usually hears in a mezzo voice. She made an immediate communicative connection with her audience, filling the hall with sound and bringing an in-the-moment urgency to the 300-year-old music.

Performing airs by Michel Lambert and Jean-Philippe Rameau and the "Medée" cantata by L.N. Clérambault, Labelle used elements of baroque style as expressive tools rather than as historically correct additions to the music.

Perfectly placed, artfully executed ornaments, along with a fabulous vibrato freedom that included straight tones, sparing applications of narrow, quick vacillations, and some broad, dramatic strokes, were all essential parts of her musical story telling."  



                                                                                                                      Elaine Schmidt, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The evening's real showstoppers were the numbers featuring Labelle.

Labelle sang with an easy command of soprano range and a big, present sound shaded with the sort of dark, rich quality one usually hears in a mezzo voice. She made an immediate communicative connection with her audience, filling the hall with sound and bringing an in-the-moment urgency to the 300-year-old music.

Performing airs by Michel Lambert and Jean-Philippe Rameau and the "Medée" cantata by L.N. Clérambault, Labelle used elements of baroque style as expressive tools rather than as historically correct additions to the music.

Perfectly placed, artfully executed ornaments, along with a fabulous vibrato freedom that included straight tones, sparing applications of narrow, quick vacillations, and some broad, dramatic strokes, were all essential parts of her musical story telling.



Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/entertainment/arts/four-nations-ensemble-soprano-labelle-add-french-accent-to-early-music-now-b99242231z1-255080941.html#ixzz2yoy8QCyC 
Follow us: @JournalSentinel on Twitter
   




Vivaldi, Juditha Triumphans
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
(Abra)

"LaBelle could sing ASCII code and still make you weak in the knees."

                                                                            Cy Ashley Webb, Stark Insider






Britten, Les Illuminations
I Musici, Montreal


" La surprise de la soirée fut la Lavalloise Dominique Labelle, qui fait carrière aux Etats-Unis et en Europe, notamment dans le domaine de la musique baroque. Elle nous a donné des Iluminations de Britten renversantes d'aplomb, d'intelligence, de qualités d'émission et de prononciation. Le timbre est superbe et l'étoffe vocale, beaucoup plus importante que ce que l'on imaginait." 
                                                                                                                      Christophe Huss, Le Devoir




Boccherini, Stabat Mater
Sarasa Ensemble


"The concert closed with Dominique Labelle’s moving presentation of Boccherini’s Stabat Mater, a composition probably completed in 1781, while the composer was working for Don Luis in Las Arenas, Spain. Labelle’s incredible control of the difficult melismatic lines and gorgeous tone in the lowest tessitura contrasted with light pizzicato playing from the strings (representing the virgin’s tears) and plaintive dissonance in the searing, lyrical passages."                                         
                                                                                                          Laura Stanfield Pritchard, The Musical Intelligencer





Mahler, Second Symphony
Columbus Symphony Orchestra


"Soloists Dominique Labelle and Sasha Cooke were ideal for this movement, with voices that soared above the massive orchestra, yet handled the tender textual passages respectfully. "
                                                                                                                                                                                    Lynn Green, The Columbus Dispatch





Monsigny, Le Roi et le fermier
CD review

"Well-trained as she was, it is doubtful, too, that Marie-Antoinette could have sung the rôle of Jenny more effulgently than Québécoise soprano Dominique Labelle.  In the ariette ‘Ce que je dis est la vérité même’ and, especially, the duo with Richard that follows, Ms. Labelle sings with total command of both the music and the character, making the most of her every appearance with singing of dash and charm."




Canteloube, Chants d'Auvergne
Carmel Bach Festival

" Labelle showed her incredible skill during this piece, as she recreated the response from the distant shepherd by singing stunningly softly while maintaining her gorgeous tone quality and deep feeling for the emotional drama of the piece. It was one of the highest points in the concert."  

                                                                                                                                                Jeff DeMarco, Peninsula Reviews





J.S. Bach, Cantata #51 ( Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen)
Aston Magna   


"Labelle, who sang Marais with the requisite attention to French Baroque declamation and ornamentation, returned at the end for Bach’s “Jauchzet Gott.” This work—which may well have originated much earlier than the 1730 date given in the notes—is not really a church cantata but rather a German equivalent of the eighteenth-century Latin solo motet; Mozart’s Exsultate, jubilate is a late example. It is, in other words, a display piece for a solo soprano, here joined by an equally virtuoso trumpet and strings.

This is a spectacular work, and it received a spectacular performance. Labelle’s singing left every note clear, even in the quick arpeggios at the end of the final Alleluja. The quieter arioso and aria at the center of the work were beautifully phrased, with fine playing here as well by continuo cellist Loretta O’Sullivan (Michael Beattie was the capable keyboard player throughout the evening, here accompanying on organ)."


                                                                                   David Schulenberg, The Boston Musical Intelligencer




Handel, Teseo,
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra

"The cast, led by the glowing soprano Dominique Labelle, as the witch Medea, and the outstanding lyric soprano Amanda Forsythe in the title role, also afforded many moments of unalloyed musical pleasure. Ms. Labelle’s voice, with its great reserves of depth and darkness, was well suited to the now regal, now witchy Medea. In “O stringerò nel sen,” one of her “evil” arias, she was not above a little cackle, and she brought out the erotic delight with which Medea imagines her rival’s torment."
                                                                                                                             CORINNA da FONSECA-WOLLHEIM, The New York Times
            


"Aside from the title role, the central antagonist is the sorceress Medea, encountered in the years after her fling with Jason and the infanticides that resulted. She's still as venomous as ever, and she uses her magical powers more than once to create elaborate stage illusions - an onslaught of demons when she's angry, an enchanted garden when she's trying to wax seductive. Those scenes must be transporting when done with full stage effects.

In their absence, we had soprano Dominique Labelle - and as Philharmonia regulars well know, she is sorceress enough. Her Medea was at once vengeful and vulnerable, sung with a combination of limpid vocal tone and rhythmic ferocity."

                                                                                                                                                                                Joshua Kosman, San Francisco Chronicle



Bach, Matthew Passion                                                                                                                          
 Orchestra of St Luke's                                                                                                                           
 Ivan Fischer, Carnegie Hall                                                                                                                     

       
“The vocal highlights of the evening, however, belonged to soprano Dominique Labelle and alto Barbara Kozelj, who imbued their respective arias and duets with crystal-clear diction, sophisticated phrasing, and a solemn stage presence."                                                                                                                                           


                                                                                                                                 Feastofmusic.com

        


Handel, Atalanta ( CD Review)



" In the title role, soprano Dominique Labelle is simply angelic. She exhibits both an indescribable augustness and, though everyone knows true love will prevail for Atalanta by the end of the opera, a surprising level of passion that is perceived as genuinely plaintive, especially in her Act II aria "Lassa, ch'io t'ho perduta" which has a piercing beauty."

                                                                                                                         

                           

                                                                                                                                                                                                      Gale Martin, Operatoonity.com





La excelencia y precisión de esta carismática canadiense fue evidente en un manejo magnánimo de su voz.

El público se puso de pie para aplaudirla después de su brillantísima ejecución del aria "Tra le procelle assorto" de la ópera "Cleopatra e Cesare", de Carl Heinrich Graun.

Las agilidades cortaron el aliento, la musicalidad fue impecable y la nobleza de su presencia, irresistible.
La excelencia y precisión de esta carismática canadiense fue evidente en un manejo magnánimo de su voz.

El público se puso de pie para aplaudirla después de su brillantísima ejecución del aria "Tra le procelle assorto" de la ópera "Cleopatra e Cesare", de Carl Heinrich Graun.

Las agilidades cortaron el aliento, la musicalidad fue impecable y la nobleza de su presencia, irresistible.

Clérambault, Médée

Four Nations Ensemble


Skaneateles Music Festival


August 24th, 2012


" Labelle’s voice was perfect for this role, the color of the instruments clearly provided the fire demanded by the text. Labelle’s sensitivity was especially evident in the central recitative in which she, for the only time in the work, allowed Medée’s vulnerability to be seen. It was a stunning moment amid the turmoil of the cantata, "

                                                                                  

                                                                                            Linda Loomis and Abel Searor,  Blog.Syracuse.com




Handel, Alexander’s Feast

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra


 First Congregational Church, April 21st, 2012,  Berkeley, CA


The soprano, looking radiant in a muted salmon gown that complemented her reddish hair, was in impeccable voice. Her high tones, virtually shorn of vibrato, shone with unblemished purity. Thanks to admirable breath control, Labelle seamlessly produced the long lines of her first air, “With ravish’d ears,” with great power, yet with no apparent effort. With her vocal beauty and shining countenance reigning over the evening as Thais did over Alexander’s senses, she was a joy to listen to.

One of Labelle’s many opportunities for radiant vocalism came in the short arioso, “Softly sweet.” Sounding for all the world like a chirping bird, her high notes soared free. The brief duet with the superb cellist William Skeen was heavenly.

In a subsequent air, the soprano seized the repeated lines “And sigh’d and look’d, sigh’d and look’d / Sigh’d and look’d, and sigh’d again” as opportunities to use eyes and sighs to great effect. How many sopranos can make the same wide-eyed expression over and over again, including in a divinely ornamented da capo, yet only increase the pleasure rather than outstay their welcome? If the play was pure McGegan, Labelle was the ideal muse.”           

                                                                                                                                                 JASON VICTOR SERINUS, San Francisco Classical Voice


Atherton, CA

Labelle, whose Philharmonia appearances always seem to enhance the orchestra's artistry, sang with an affecting blend of vocal purity and dramatic expression; the Canadian soprano's Act I arioso, "Softly sweet, in Lydian measures," floating over a gentle cello obbligato, was especially alluring. Winant, a member of the Philharmonia Chorale, made pristine contributions” 

                                                                                                                                                                                    Georgia Rowe,  San Jose Mercury News


Herbst Theater, San Francisco

“The first half of the evening was dominated by Dominique Labelle. If you were stone-cold deaf and not immediately won over by her honey-toned coloratura, you’d be taken in by her laugh-aloud simpering treatment of several airs. Ever the coquette, she “sigh’d and look’d, sigh’d and looked, sigh’d and looked and sigh’d again.” Her theatrics alone are worth the price of admission.”

                                                                                                                                               Cy Ashley Webb, Stark Insider




Mozart, Requiem

Orchestra Of Saint-Luke’s


Carnegie Hall, April 12th, 2012


“Of the vocal soloists the soprano, Dominique Labelle, was splendid”

                                                                                                                                  James R. Oestreich,  The New York Times



Handel, Le Messie

I Musici de Montréal


La nouvelle salle de la Place des arts, Montreal, 6 avril 2012


“Chez les solistes, la palme va à la soprano Dominique Labelle. Cette Canadienne qui fait surtout carrière à l'étranger m'étonne à chacun de ses retours ici. De toute évidence, elle travaille sa voix et son interprétation avec le plus grand sérieux. En fait, des quatre voix solistes, celle de Dominique Labelle fut la seule à m'émouvoir, et ce jusque dans l'ornementation devenue instrument d'expression.”         

                                                                                                                                                                                                              Claude Gingras, La Presse




Vivaldi, In turbato mare irato

Voices of Music



San Francisco, California, March 3rd, 2012



“Labelle is exceptional among early-music sopranos in that she manages to fill the concert hall with a naturally beautiful tone while maintaining a warm richness. I have the impression that the difficult coloratura runs in Vivaldi’s solo motet In turbato mare irato come so naturally to Labelle that even she would not be able to describe how she accomplishes them. The Voices of Music strings followed her lead in producing a rich, round tone through this multitextured composition (unusual in Vivaldi). It has been argued that such works are inappropriate as church music, though nothing in Labelle’s vocalism indicated she was showing off. She is simply that good, and cannot help it.”


                                                                                                                                                                            Thomas Busse, San Francisco Classical Voice





Monsigny, Le roi et le fermier

Role of Jenny



Chateau de Versailles, France, 4 et 5 février, 2012



“La part du lion reviens néanmoins à la sublime Dominique Labelle, qui nous a charmé dans ses interventions haendéliennes avec Alan Curtis (Radamisto, Deidamia) et maintenant nous restitue avec panache, charme et délicatesse les délicieuses parties musicales de Jenny.”

                                                                                                                                               Pedro-Octavio Diaz, Muse Baroque



“La soprano Dominique Labelle qui fait valoir dans le répertoire hacndelien de remarquables qualités belcantistes, apporte a la pauvre Jenny la sensibilité d'un personnage préromantique.”


                                                                                                                                                                                             Jacques Bonnaure, Magazine Opéra




The Kennedy Center, Washington, DC, Rose Theater, New York City

January 21st, 2012, January 26th, 2012


“Labelle’s mix of vibrancy and creamy tone gave welcome weight to her character’s lovely arias.”


                                                                                                                                                                                                            Joe Banno, Washington Post


“Dominique Labelle was a winning Jenny.”  

                                                                                                                                                                                        Vivien Schweizer, The New YorkTimes


                                                                           



Handel, Messiah

Disney Hall, Los Angeles, CA

December  14th 2011


“Labelle’s soaring soprano was exquisite – in every Air and Recitative, but especially in a touching “I know that my Redeemer liveth.” “

               

                                                                                                                                                                      Don Heckman, The International Review of Music




Mozart Requiem

Raleigh, North-Carolina

September 8th-11th, 2011


“Soprano Dominique Labelle’s voice is like a laser with a soul. She has the regrettably unique ability to hit crystal clear high notes from big interval jumps without scooping into the pitch and/or ululating with a huge vibrato.”

                                                                                                                                             Jeffrey Rossman, www.cnvc.org




Händel- Orlando 

Ravinia, Mostly Mozart, Tanglewood

August 11th-16th, 2011



“First of all, the singing was sublime. First among equals was the inimitable Dominique Labelle. Ms. Labelle has a way of finishing her phrases which makes them hang there. I could swear she was still singing a couple of times after a phrase finished. Her singing always reminds me of the tale of Echo, a Baroque favorite, in that the actual beauty of it seems to linger beyond its own life. She is one of my favorite singers.”


                                                                                                                                     Keith Kibler, The Berkshire Review



“Angelica, Queen of Cathay, was soprano Dominique Labelle, who sang befitting this ultimate yet elusive regal object of desire; she was wrapped in an amethyst robe complemented by coruscating gems (a fortune in crystal masquerading as an even larger fortune in precious stones). “

                                                                                                    Cashman Kerr Prince  The Boston Musical Intelligencer


“Dominique Labelle used her flexible, burnished soprano thoughtfully in her dignified characterization of Angelica, and her florid ornamentation was often dazzling.”    

                                                                                                                                  --The New York Times



“Canadian soprano Dominique Labelle as the queen Angelica served up vocal fireworks on cue...” 

                                                                                                                                                --Chicago Classical Review


“...Labelle invested Angelica with imperious aplomb through fine musicality and technique.” 

                                                                                                                                                               --Chicago Tribune





Händel- Baroque Evening

Aspen Music Festival Orchestra

Aspen, Colorado, July 9th, 2011


“The highlights were Labelle's heart-rending offering of “Piangero,” from Handel's opera “Giulio Cesare,” and jaw-dropping execution of Baroque coloratura in Handel's “Gloria,” an early composition only recently discovered.


Labelle's transparent soprano lets the rapid-fire passages flow and allows her to color every word, every phrase with subtlety, the better to bring human emotion to the music. Sometimes that emotion centered on pity, as in “Piangero”; at other times humor, as in “the Prince, unable to conceal his pain,” from Handel's Alexander's Feast, which describes the inebriated title character going ga-ga in public over a beauty. “


                                                                                                                                                                Harvey Steinman,  The Aspen Times

      


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 


Haydn- The Creation

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra

San Francisco, April 11, 2011


"Soprano Dominique Labelle was
nothing short of exquisite, bringing silvery tone and pinpoint virtuosity to her assignment; her
impersonation of the newly minted birds, complete with an array of vocal trills, was a tour de force."

                                                                                                                                                            Joshua Kosman

                                                                                                                                   San Francisco Chronicle


Handel - Messiah

Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra 

Cincinnati, December 21, 2009 


"Single most moving number 

[...] ”Soprano Labelle was perfectly matched to her task. ... And her 'I know that my redeemer liveth' was the single most moving number during the entire, two-and-a-half-hour oratorio."

Mary Ellyn Hutton
Music in Cincinnati


Handel - In Praise of Music

Washington Bach Consort 

North Bethesda, May 3, 2009 


"Roses bursting into bloom 

[...] ”Also starring in Handel’s Gloria, soprano Dominique Labelle has an astounding voice, one of impassioned resonance and incredible skill. Her trills unfold miraculously out of sustained tones like roses bursting into bloom."

Cecelia Porter
The Washington Post


Handel - Athalia

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra 

Berkeley, April 18, 2009 


"Wickedly good 

[...] ”Labelle has been Philharmonia’s soprano of choice in these leading Handelian roles for many seasons now, but Saturday’s performance revealed a new measure of intensity and flexibility in her approach....Labelle tore through [‘My vengeance awakes me’] with almost alarming ferocity; in the defiant ‘To darkness eternal,’ she faced her end through torrents of impeccable coloratura....a performance of thrilling virtuosity and dramatic power." 

     (Click here for the full original review.) 

Joshua Kosmant
San Francisco Chronicle


"Full-Force Heroine 

[...] ”For those who have heard [Dominique Labelle] frequently with this orchestra, the wonder is not that she keeps getting better, but that she displays such variety and range, and possesses such stage presence, that she’s able to do all kinds of roles. She played Athalia to the hilt, from the opening nightmare sequence to the famous rage aria, 'My vengeance awakes me.' " 

     (Click here for the full original review.) 

Michael Zwiebach
San Francisco Classical Voice



Handel - La Passion et la raison 

  L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato

Arion Ensemble 

Quebec City, March 27, 2009 


"A superb cantata 

[...] ”Of the four soloists, Dominique Labelle is the one with the most wonderful moments of the evening. The soprano possesses a great instrument, in which the natural color and suppleness can be compared to a nightingale....it is her generosity, roundness and warmth that touches you. Each word that comes out of her mouth has its own importance. We call this musicality." 

     (Click here for the full original review, en francais.) 

Richard Boisvert
Le Soleil


Montreal, March 26, 2009 


"A first rate artist 

[...] ”Dominique Labelle sings with the technical and expressive prowess of a first rate artist. Her duet with the flute was ravishing." 

     (Click here for the full original review, en francais.) 

Claude Gingras
La Presse



Handel, Purcell, and Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater

Sarasa Ensemble - Boston Early Music Festival 

Cambridge, February 7, 2009 


"From intimate to grand 

[...] ”Saturday's concert of Baroque repertoire by Dominique Labelle and Michael Chance - along with... the Sarasa Ensemble - was interesting in how, with only four players and two singers, it ranged from polished miniature to operatic extra-large." 

     (Click here for the full review.) 

Matthew Guerrieri
The Boston Globe (Boston)


Handel

Iceland Symphony Orchestra - Your Favorite Baroque 

Reykjavik, November 20, 2008 


"A light in the darkness 

[...] ”Dominique Labelle's clear and beautiful voice played a big part in making the evening a success. Her singing was full of colour and emotion, while respectful of the music's essential precision. A virtually perfect balance between technique and expression. 

"Such an experience is to be cherished in these dark times."

Jónas Sen


Handel Il delirio amoroso

Handel & Haydn Society - Italian Virtuosi 

Boston, March 21, 2008 





"Rare and Cherishable 

[...] “Golden-voiced Dominique Labelle dazzled the audience at Jordan Hall... In one repeated passage, Chloris holds onto a high note forever while the solo violinist goes nuts, and Labelle was effortlessly thrilling. She’s one of those rare and cherishable artists for whom there’s no gulf between passionate emotional conviction and technical control.”

Lloyd Schwartz
The Phoenix (Boston)





Handel Gloria

Musica Angelica - Holiday Celebration 

Los Angeles, December 1-2, 2007 


"Dominique Labelle sails through zesty work by Antonio Caldara 

[...] "For all intents and purposes, though, the evening mostly belonged to the marvelous Canadian guest soprano Dominique Labelle, who produced an effortless, golden flow of vocal sound. She soared gloriously in Handel’s joyous, recently authenticated Gloria...articulating the florid melismas clearly and cohesively....Labelle inserted a short, graceful, zesty work by Antonio Caldara, ‘Haec est regina virginum,’ sailing through the tricky rhythmic passages with ease....Labelle’s voice remained stable and luminous throughout the concluding Bach Cantata No. 51..."

Richard S. Ginell
Los Angeles Times


[...] "Canadian soprano Dominique Labelle’s bright, pure tone reminded me of Emma Kirby, but has more body and warmth than the English soprano. It was splendidly accurate in the virtuoso vocal part of Bach’s popular Jauchzet Gott Cantana No. 51, receiving lively support from conductor Haselböck. Bach’s instrumental, angular vocal writing contrasts sharply with the operatic, Italian style by Handel in his Gloria sacred cantata, written during Handel’s 1707 Italian trip. Ms. Labelle’s gleaming soprano was powerful and brilliant in the abundant coloraturas, runs and roulades; it also sported a delicate, finely-spun trill in moments of lyrical pathos. A prolific opera composer in Rome and Barcelona, Antonio Caldara’s sacred aria ‘Haec est regina virginum’ was well served by Labelle’s graceful and elegant singing. All told, this was music-making of the highest order."

Truman C. Wang
Classical Voice


'De keizerin zingt!'

De Nederlandse Bachvereniging - Joseph en Michael Haydn 

Amsterdam, October 23, 2007 


 "Sopraan Labelle zingt virtuoos met ronde toon 

[...] De Canadese sopraan Dominique Labelle, in haar vocale aandeel en ook fysiek het meest aanwezig, zong haar virtuoze partijen met een sympathiek ronde toon die prachtig mengde met de klank van koor en orkest."

Bela Luttmer
Volkskrant


Translation of the above: 

"Soprano Labelle Sings Consummately With a Round Tone 

[...] The Canadian soprano Dominique Labelle, in both her vocal and physical roles the most commanding, sang her virtuoso parts with a sympathetic, round tone, which blended magnificently with the sounds of the choir and orchestra." 






SELECTED EXCERPTS





Shostakovich op 127 for soprano, cello and violin

CBC/McGill University 

Montreal, October 4, 2006 


 "Labelle domine le concert Chostakovitch 

[...] Sans chercher à adopter une voix russe à la Vichnevskaya, créatrice du cycle [les Sept Romances d'Alexander Blok], la minuscule Dominique Labelle rendit par ses propres moyens vocaux et interprétatifs, et avec la plus entière conviction, la tristesse, la mélancolie, l'horreur et l'épouvante qui s'y succèdent. Au besoin, le chant devenait cri, mais un cri toujours musical. [...]"

Claude Gingras
La Presse


Translation of the above: 

"Labelle Stands Out at the Shostakovich concert 

[...] Without trying to imitate the Russian style of Vishnevskaya who first sang the [Seven Romances on poems by Alexander Blok], the diminutive Dominique Labelle conveyed through her own vocal and interpretative means, and with the utmost conviction, the feelings of sadness, melancholy, dread and fear depicted in the work. If need be, her singing was like a cry, but a cry that was always musical [...]" 






BACH - Cantata No. 202 "Wedding"

Boston Baroque 


"...Really, everybody needs more Dominique Labelle in their lives. There's operatic glamour in the voice, of course, and technique and control to burn. But it was little short of amazing how she could turn vibrato on and off, vary it, manage both steep and gradual changes in volume, toss off ornaments, or merely suggest what she was doing -- and (this could be seen) light up the faces of the early-music specialists on stage with her. Here was Dominique Labelle, the compleat early-music singer, and no mere impersonator of one. Brava!"

The Boston Globe


Carmen - "Micaela"

Christopher Wilkins 

San Antonio Symphony 


"Soprano Dominique Labelle was glorious as Micaela, Don Jose's faithful hometown girl. The security and organlike projection of Labelle's voice were matched by a warmth of delivery that made her Act III arias melt the heart."

Mike Greenberg
San Antonio Express





BRITTEN - Les Illuminations

Susan Davenny Wyner 

New England String Ensemble 


"If people could hear performances like the heated, voluptuous one that Labelle and Wyner concocted, they would be seduced for life. Although the work was composed with a tenor in mind, Labelle may be the ideal female interpreter...she sings the texts with a wonderful idiomatic flavor...her voice not only can spin out the upper galactic high notes, but she brings a wonderful palette of vocal hues to tint the images."

Ellen Pfeifer
The Boston Globe





DONIZETTI - Lucia di Lammermoor - "Lucia"

Stephen Lord 

Boston Lyric Opera 


"Labelle is the belle of 'Lucia'...Always when Dominique Labelle was pouring her heart into Lucia's music...powerful emotions held sway. Labelle has sung often and well in this city, but never this well. Nine years ago, Carlo Bergonzi heard the promise of the great Lucia in her student performance of the fountain aria, and Labelle has fulfilled that promise. She will improve on her first effort, but it is already and in every respect a world-class performance. If she had sung it in London, New York, or Paris, she would have awakened yesterday a star...The polar paradigms for this role are Callas and Joan Sutherland. Labelle has it all -- an amber beauty of tone and an easy, limpid flexibility; she sings with feeling, fantasy, and involvement. The soprano observes all the traditional accents of the role and sings the familiar cadenza with flute, but also brings many personal touches and fresh ornamentation adapted to her voice and to Lucia's predicaments....Her singing and acting always communicated truth. Some of her high Cs and Ds were firebombs hurled at a gasping audience; her E-flat, clear and lovely."

Richard Dyer
The Boston Globe


"Dominique Labelle gave the musical performance of her life as Lucia. Not only did she negotiate all the extraordinary coloratura with technical security and luscious tone, but she sang everything meaningfully and clearly, with Lucia's dementia fully encompassed. At the beginning of her first aria, when she describes the eerie moonlit night in which she first saw the ghost by the fountain, her voice takes on that haunted luminescence. And no matter what crazy antics Alden prescribed for her, the dramatic truth of her singing didn't vary."

Ellen Pfeifer
The Boston Herald


"Boston Lyric Opera's remake of one of the most familiar of operas...is saved chiefly by Dominique Labelle's remarkable portrayal of the heroine....Labelle turns this unorthodox and challenging concept of the doomed heroine into a poignant characterization. Her sculpted, word-centered vocalism accumulates expressive depth, and she touchingly conveys Lucia's despair at her lover's apparent betrayal. In Labelle's performance, the famous mad scene isn't just fancy singing of trills and roulades, it is a chillingly real portrayal of a mentally unhinged person, with the bonus of creamy, shaded tone and stratospheric notes that ring like bells."

Peter M. Knapp
The Patriot Ledger


"Dominique Labelle possessed her character and let her character possess her. Every word and phrase was individually felt and projected, the whole molded into an ongoing legato of great beauty. Her middle voice is filled with color and rises confidently to Cs, Ds and Es. Her coloratura is fluent and always at the service of the emotion of the moment -- it is never mere vocalise. The complete Mad Scene was a tour de force, begun as she was revealed seated dementedly next to the man she had just struck down. She existed in her own world, sometimes interacting with members of the individually characterized chorus but somehow being in a reality totally different from theirs. Although she has her own unique style and timbre, the total impression was strongly reminiscent of the young Renata Scotto -- the intensity, concentration, vocal command, gorgeous many-colored tone and ability to reach out to every member of the audience personally. The man sitting next to me was leaning over, gripping the back of the seat in front of him during the entire Mad Scene."

William A. Fregosi
Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Saul - "Michal"

Nicholas McGegan 

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra 


"...the most extraordinary performance came from soprano Dominique Labelle as Michal, who delivered a seemingly endless supply of gorgeous sound shaped with artistry and ease."

Joshua Kosman
San Francisco Chronicle


Cantatas: "Un'alma innamorata", "Languia di bocca lusinghiera"

Sarasa Chamber Music Series 


"Saturday night brought the privilege of hearing soprano Dominique Labelle...Her voice was luscious, flexible, and even over a wide range, and it was thrilling to hear her glorious sound up close. Labelle never sings a meaningless word or an empty phrase; she invests everything with emotion. Her coloratura and ornamentation are always brilliant but never merely that."

Richard Dyer
The Boston Globe


"She was in thrilling voice, making the artifice as exciting as possible while revealing the humanity within it. And she made this all seem easy."

Lloyd Schwartz
Boston Phoenix


MOZART - Don Giovanni - "Donna Anna"

Peter Sellars 

PepsiCo Summerfare Festival (Purchase, NY) 


"Dominique Labelle's Anna is warm-voiced, exciting, and dramatically harrowing..."

Leighton Kerner


The Marriage of Figaro - "Countess Almaviva"

Thanos Adamopoulos 

Virginia Opera 


"As Countess Almaviva, Canadian soprano Dominique Labelle has a voice like a Godiva truffle -- dark, sweet and creamy. She makes the transition from neglected, loving wife to gloriously forgiving partner with economy and grace. Her second act aria, 'Porgi amor,' is simply exquisite."

M.D. Ridge
OnStage Magazine


Le Nozze di Figaro - "Susanna"

Derrick Inouyue 

Vancouver Opera 


"That elusive quality was provided by Dominique Labelle's Susanna, enchanting in its insouciance, tinged with a touch of acid, and attractively full-toned and expressively sung."

F. B. St. Clair
Opera


"Labelle's 'Deh vieni, non tardar' is a masterpiece of invitation and enticement."

Michael Scott
The Vancouver Sun


PUCCINI - La Boheme - "Mimi"

Stewart Robertson 

Glimmerglass Opera 


"Labelle must be the most complete Mimi since the young Teresa Stratas. She doesn't sound like Stratas; she has her own steady, glowing, soaring sound. But she has that same kind of intensity and concentration; you can't take your eyes off her, and her charm, tenderness, impulsiveness, flirtatiousness, and fear of her own mortality make you fall in love with Mimi all over again. At the very end, Labelle did something unforgettable -- she thanked Musetta for the warming muff and bade her little farewells to her Bohemian friends. But no matter where Rodolfo moved to consult anxiously with Musetta or his roommates, Labelle's huge, liquid eyes never strayed from him, as if she could not bear to let him leave her sight, as if she were drinking up these moments, as if she wanted to keep him in her gaze forever. It was heartbreaking."

Richard Dyer
The Boston Globe


"And musically, this show generally sparkled. At the center was an exceptional Mimi, in the person of soprano Dominique Labelle. With a warm, plump sound and a keen sense of how to hold the stage, Labelle made the sad little seamstress into a touching but not maudlin creature. Hers was a large, nicely controlled voice with an especially ravishing upper register."

Steve Metcalf
The Hartford Courant


Rigoletto - "Gilda"

Robert Spano 

Boston Lyric Opera 


"As Gilda, Dominique Labelle is extraordinary. Her Gilda was girlish without being cute, complex, sympathetic and nearly angelic in her death scene."

Ellen Pfeifer
The Boston Herald


"The good was glorious. For 40 years now I have been telling anyone who would listen that Hilde Gueden was the best Gilda I have ever heard; I am going to have to spend the next 40 saying that Dominique Labelle was better. Labelle brings a unique fullness and radiance of tone and spirit to the role, like the young Mirella Freni in other operas -- Freni never had the virtuoso technique that Labelle does, and never sang Gilda....the emotional and dramatic imagination and complete and compelling honesty of Labelle's singing and acting did the rest. She sang 'Caro nome' not as a showpiece, but as a slow and dreamy avowal, audaciously preceding it with adolescent giggles of rapture: this Gilda was full-blooded, passionate, utterly convincing, utterly heartbreaking."

Richard Dyer
The Boston Globe





VIVALDI - Giustino - "Arianna"

Alan Curtis 

Il Complesso Barocco 


"If one laurel had to be awarded, it would certainly go to the Canadian soprano Dominique Labelle (who earlier this year gave the 'official world premiere' of Handel's rediscovered Gloria), who burned the stage with her vibrant voice, great presence and splendid vocal technique."

De Doelen
Rotterdam


"With appealing easiness and clean tessitura, going from the mood of being lovesick from dear grief to obstinate fury without ornate embellishment, Dominique Labelle offered many of the highlights of the performance."

Eva Bachmann
Neue Mittelland Zeitung

   




YEHUDI WYNER - "On this Most Voluptuous Night"

Lydian String Quartet 

New World Records 


"Soprano Dominique Labelle's mesmerizing beauty of tone, mastery of line, and intensity of focus makes this cycle a deliciously evocative experience."

Victor Carr, Jr.
ClassicsToday.com



Mozart Requiem with Ivan Fischer and Orchestra of St-Luke's, Carnegie Hall.